Posts Tagged ‘deception’

Pastor Tim Rogers of Ebenezer Baptist Church in Indian Trail, North Carolina is up to his deceptive ways again. This time it includes a favorite target of his illogical “thinking”–Lifeway.

Sometime in recent days LifeWay Research mailed a survey to a portion of Southern Baptist Churches. According to a friend it included 43 questions with well over 125 possible responses. Between 35 – 40 of these were of the strongly agree, strongly disagree, I don’t know, neither agree or disagree variety of survey responses. The questions cover a very, very broad section of church life, theology and decision making. The survey appears to expect answers from either the senior pastor or other church leader.

In his post of April 14, 2012, “An Upcoming Lifeway Survey-The Timing is Uncanny, by Tim Rogers,” Tim Rogers fans furiously to create a fire out of nothing. Unfortunately for him the only smoke to be seen is coming out of his ears.

First he deceives his readers by implying the survey has something to do with the name change task force in the SBC. Tim Rogers writes:

I opened a large envelope to find a survey of forty-three questions that began with a question concerning the Task Force that was appointed through a “back-door” reading of our constitution…

Perhaps it is that Pastor Tim Rogers cannot count, because the question to which he refers is fourth on the list, not first.

Why the need to be deceptive, “Pastor” Rogers?

He then turns to one of his favorite whipping boys: the Calvinism debate in the SBC. With density that lead would envy Rogers says:

In this opening article I want to look at two statements to help you see the theological bend the Research Team seems to desire.

[In Rogers’ writing the following two lines are bold and in red. It should also be noted the original survey included the proper punctuation at the end of each sentence. Rogers seems to think proper punctuation is unnecessary; he certainly feels that way about logic and truth.]

1. My church is theologically reformed or Calvinist
2. My church is theologically Arminian or Wesleyan

The statements above represents [sic] the theological positions one my [sic] choose from. From the look of things it is a clear straight forward statement that defines what one believes…What person in a Southern Baptist Church is going to say their church is “Arminian or Wesleyan”? Therefore a pastor has only to choose between “reformed or Calvinist”…I am not an Arminian, and neither am I a Wesleyan. These theological positions places [sic] one in the uncomfortable position of arguing one is not saved forever. Thus, we must choose “reformed or Calvinist”.

Thus, we must choose “crazy or ignorant” to describe Roger Dodger’s conclusions.

“Theological bend”? He can determine that by misrepresenting two questions? Can Rogers also bend spoons by staring at them? Something is bent, that’s for sure. According to Tim Rogers’ delusions the research team must also have a “theological bend” toward pastoral visits, new members classes, death of church members, international mission trips and the like since all of this is surveyed on the same survey.

If a tangled web we weave “when first we practice to deceive,” Pastor Tim Rogers must trip over its strands every time he stands to walk to the pulpit.

On the survey the two statements in the Rogers quote above are each accompanied by five answering options: “Strongly disagree, Somewhat disagree, Somewhat agree, Strongly agree, Don’t Know.” It is not either/or.

CLEARLY there are not only two options as he implies. There are multiple options INCLUDING the opportunity to select a different category altogether by strongly disagreeing with both. This fact Pastor Tim Rogers is not willing to acknowledge.

A commenter on Tim Rogers’ blog, Tom Klein, immediately called him out on this (6:47pm same day):

Then, you misstate (or maybe misunderstand) how polls work. A mainstream SBC baptist would simply answer both of your questions near the middle. You must not understand how polls work since you don’t “choose between” separate questions. You choose within them on a scale.

This is obviously the case.

Since most Southern Baptists, including the ones at Ebenezer Baptist Church in Indian Trail, North Carolina, will never see this survey, Rogers has done a great disservice to his readers and his church members by this deceit.

We are left with three likely conclusions:
1) He is intentionally deceptive. Therefore, his church should rebuke him.
2) He is unintentionally deceptive. Therefore, his church should re-educate him.
3) He is incompetent. Therefore, his church should remove him.

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If it was not for the wretched sinfulness of the whole thing, Pastor Peter Lumpkins recent blog article on “Holiness” would be delicious irony. Instead it’s a travesty of the seriousness of God’s word. On March 11, 2012, he writes:

I’m preaching a sermon today from the Old Testament entitled “Hungering for Holiness.” One particular corpus of Scripture which I find especially moving today includes the following (embolden added)>>>

Give unto the LORD the glory due unto his name: bring an offering, and come before him: worship the LORD in the beauty of holiness (1 Chron 16:29)

Give unto the LORD the glory due unto his name; worship the LORD in the beauty of holiness… . O worship the LORD in the beauty of holiness: fear before him, all the earth… . Thy people shall be willing in the day of thy power, in the beauties of holiness from the womb of the morning: thou hast the dew of thy youth (Psalm 29:2; 96:9; 110:3)

One is left to assume the “beauty of holiness” does not apply to Plumpkins since, on his blog, he continues to lie, deceive and distort.

His near obsession with Rick Warren’s supposed “Bridge to Mecca” yet again demonstrates his willingness to believe the worst about Christian leaders with whom he disagrees. (See my last post as an example of this typical Lumpkins behavior. https://spoutingnonsense.wordpress.com/2012/03/05/after-apology-pastor-peter-lumpkins-continues-to-attack-southern-baptist-leaders/)
(more…)

Here is a thread from a Baptist forum that deals with other lies that Tim “Roger Dodger” Rogers has told recently. Lies that he currently tells and will tell in the future should come as no surprise.

http://forums.baptistlife.com/viewtopic.php?f=5&t=8277

Facts and exchanges are sprinkled throughout, at least through the comment time-stamped Wed Apr 21, 2010 5:29 pm.

This is nothing new. Do a google search with any combination of the terms, “Peter Lumpkins Tim Rogers lie lies liar” and you might be amazed at what you find. And that does not even include the blogs where they have been banned for being liars, divisive and abusive.

Perhaps there is no one in all of blogdumb who has less ability to connect the dots than Pastor Tim Rogers, AKA “Roger Dodger.” Roger Dodger is a pastor in North Carolina who has a blog on which he writes some of the most ludicrous things you could ever imagine. Misspelled words, frequent grammatical errors and logical hare-kari greet his readers in almost every post.

A recent post sported the egregious title, Lifeway Admits they are Producing Non-Gospel Sunday School Lessons. In the egotistical style of his mentor, Plumpkins, he writes his name directly into the title of each new post. Really attentive to AP style these two are.

It must first be noticed that Roger Dodger lied in the title of his post. He probably believed it to be true, but that will not let him off the hook. Of course, Lifeway has admitted no such a thing, nor, in the mind of most sane persons and even some animals, would they need to do it. After all, they provide “Biblical solutions for life.” The Gospel Project, which is the subject of Roger Dodger’s diatribe, was developed after churches requested from Lifeway a more in-depth curriculum. That according to interviews with Trevin Wax, an editor with the company. For Roger Dodger the name-The Gospel Project-is a “tacit admission” of Lifeway. A tacit admission of what? That Lifeway hasn’t been teaching the gospel, he asserts.

See how clear that is?

In his February 3, 2012 entry there are so many disjointed sentences, disconnected thoughts, pure conjecture and lies in the first paragraph alone, it should behoove anyone who graduated 6th grade that an adult would ever read this stuff. Thankfully, few do. A sampling:

The Gospel Project is a new curriculum released by Lifeway but put together by non-Southern Baptists.

This is a bald-faced lie. Eight of the 11 members of the advisory board were Southern Baptists, and the other three were Baptists. Among the writers are those who have worked on current Lifeway curriculum. The general editor and managing editor are Southern Baptist. THE COMPANY THAT PRODUCES IT IS SOUTHERN BAPTIST! Why Rogers finds it necessary to lie is strange, confusing and unnecessary. And from a pastor?

Again:

Another of the advisors is Matt Chandler, Pastor of the Village Church in Dallas Texas [sic]. This is a church that is affiliated with the SBC, but something else about Pastor Chandler is his position on the Board of Directors with Acts 29.

This is a classic example of Roger Dodger’s inability to connect dots. What does Acts 29 have to do with Lifeway presenting the gospel in his curriculum? Not a thing at all. But, Southern Baptist Matt Chandler (you know, one of those Southern Baptists who were not involved in The Gospel Project, but were?) is on the board of the church planting network Acts 29, so Lifeway must have admitted they were not teaching the gospel.

Riiigght.

Then, invoking the pin-all cupie-doll, Mark Driscoll, who is 1) not Southern Baptist and 2) not involved with The Gospel Project, in order to tie him (via Acts 29) to Ed Stetzer, who is Southern Baptist, Roger Dodger mentions Driscoll’s much maligned and praised book on marriage as a reason to be concerned about The Gospel Project. Ok, once again: Lifeway admits they produce Sunday School lessons that do not include the gospel (which they don’t do), because it is not produced by Southern Baptists (even though it is), and because Matt Chandler is on the board (but he’s Southern Baptist, but it doesn’t matter), and because Mark Driscoll and Ed Stetzer (a Southern Baptist) once served together with Acts 29 (which has nothing at all do do with any of it), and Driscoll wrote an explicit book on marriage, Southern Baptists should be on high alert about this curriculum.

This is so sad because it is utterly unbiblical. Between the outright lies, blatant distortions, nonsensical “logic” and extreme conjecture, only a person who cannot think for themselves, and does not care about truth, would take Roger Dodger seriously.